The Representation of Arabs, Berbers and Turks in Barbary Captivity Narratives: A Literary Analysis

Rachid TITOUCHE

Résumé


The following paper is a tentative analysis of the representation of Arabs, Berbers and Turks in Barbary captivity narratives. Pegged to historicist and cultural materialist criticism, it aims at demonstrating how narration and discourse in these narratives of the Other (Algerians) function as ideological sites to service a nascent nation (America) in desperate need of usable myths. 

  

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Références


Baepler Paul, “Introduction,” in Baepler Paul, ed., White Slaves, African Masters, Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1999.

Ebersole Gary L., Captured by Texts: Puritan to Postmodern Images of Indian Captivity, Charlottesville and London: University Press of Virginia, 2003.

Fisher Sir Godrey, Barbary Legend: War, Trade and Piracy in North Africa 1415-1830, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1957.

Foss John D., (1798) “A Journal of the Captivity and Sufferings of John Foss,” in Paul Baepler, ed., White Slaves, African Masters, Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1999.

Gee Joshua (1680) Narrative of Joshua Gee of Boston, Mass., While he was Captive in Algiers of the Barbary Pirates, Hartford: Wadsworth Atheneum, 1943.

Milton Giles, White Gold: The Extraordinary Story of Thomas Pellow and North Africa’s One Million European Slaves, London: Hodder and Stoughton, 2005.

Jefferson Thomas, “Letter to John Adams, Paris, July 11, 1786,” in Albert Ellery Bergh, ed. The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, Vol.5, The Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904.

Rowson Susanna Haswell (1794), Slaves in Algiers, or A Struggle for Freedom: A Play Interspersed with Songs eds., Jennifer Margulis and Karen M. Poremski, Acton, Mass., 2000.

Said Edward (1978), Orientalism: Western Conceptions of the Orient, London: Penguin, 1991.

Sari J. Nasir, The Arabs and the English, London: Longman, 1976. Speaking of the William Lithgow’s representation of the Arabs in his travelogue A Most Delectable and True Discourse of a Painful Peregrination (1614), Sari writes that “Lithgow’s account of the Arabs of what the first American settlers reported of the Red Indians. In one story the Arabs were said to use “bows and arrows” against their foes. The story in Lithgow’s words was as follows: “Scarcely were wee well advanced in our way, till wee were beset with more three hundred Arabs, who sent us from shrubby heights an unexpected shower of arrows.” (p.27)

Slotkin Richard, (1885) The Fatal Environment: The Myth of the Frontier in the Age of Industrialisation 1800-1890, New York: Simon and Schuster Inc., 1998.

Slotkin Richard, (1885) The Fatal Environment: The Myth of the Frontier in the Age of Industrialisation 1800-1890, New York: Simon and Schuster Inc., 1998.


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